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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
of situations in this are already legal non conforming uses and in the night time entertainment they are and they're not permitted and office in the area and it's not permitted anywhere in western soma and those two uses and everybody that exists, everybody that is legal and exists are probably non conforming uses. in terms of creating new non conforming uses there is none of that but a good one is the creation of pdr in bay view as well as other examples. >> i think the notice is just important because we get people at the last minute that who didn't realize this was going on because they didn't get a legal notice and people don't see things until they're in front of their faces anyway, and i guess the other question about the notification. okay. now you're going to have legal non conforming uses and some knew that but they were allowed to exist. is there like the eastern neighborhoods some amnecessity or process by which you are doing letters of determination? what is the process if you're existing legal non conforping office use and now we're going to be zoning you in the
study if jtap would be feasible for us to use and if it is, it would be fantastic. our concern is if it's only used during a sdas ster and it's not used on a daily basis, are you going to have to spend a lot of time training? it's not really hard to use but there are some complexities with it. so it is a big job in the city tracking patient movement and we are addressing it. and i think we're waiting for the feasibility study to kind of determine what our next step would be. >> i think there was another question here. yes. >> yes, we know from hsda studies that for a very large earthquake you can expect perhaps tens of thousands of individuals that will need hospital treatment and hospitals are generally fairly full anyway. was there any discussion of altered standards of care during your workshops? >> not during the workshop specifically but it is something we've discussed at our hospital council group on and off and it is something the counseling association of hospitals is working on as well. i think we have to think as a group locally what type of policy we would want to have. i
and gentlemen, the fire boat phoenix. long may she serve san francisco. next is line is the u.s. navy guided missile destroyer, the u.s.s. rebel. equipped with the aegis combat system. it was commissioned in 2002 and deployed last year from san diego as part of the ronald reagan strike group. it was one of first ships to provide humanitarian assistance following the earthquake and tsunami in japan. the first responder, the rebel embarked navy helicopters surveyed the coast line to provide an aerial perspective for the damage to other ships for relief efforts. after hearing first hand from survivors, the crew volunteered to provide assistance. during deployment also conducted counter piracy patrol to enforce exclusive zones in the region. should ship's names sake, edward rebel served in the revolutionary war and searched in a bold complain against pirates and helped shape the fighting spirit that has been characteristic of the u.s. navy. the u.s.s. rebel is the sixth ship to bare the next time. there's 9217 tons and can sail in excess of 30 knots. there's 30 officers and 270 enlisted personne
. the engine that was used and seen in the movie, "titanic". she travels 10 knots. the obrian was named in the national defense in our own sasoon bay. in the 1970's, the idea of preserving the ship began to develop and the ship was put aside for preservation instead of being sold or scrapped. in the mid- 1978's, the memorial was formed to restore the obrian and the first of thousands of hours of work to resurrect the ship from her preserved limbo. she was the last ship in the moth ball fleet. after months of preparation including the cleaning and testing of machinery and systems, the ship left the fleet, the only vessel to do so of her own power. please rises and salute the u.s.s. jeremiah o'brien. thank you. >> the ship then moved to fort mason from the san francisco waterfront to the west of fisherman's wharf. she became dedicated to the ships by the merchant marines. she began her second tour around the san francisco bay. she resumes her duties in san francisco and moving to her final place in fisherman's wharf. she has ventured to the pacific northwest in 1996 and more recently, to
seized the panamanian freighter and confiscated the largest drug seizure in history. in 1977, the u.s. adopted the 200 mile exclusive economic zone in response to growing concern over marine region. especially off the vast coast line of the north pacific and the berring see. in may of 1979, cutter sherman was transferred to alameda, california. including fishery, law enforcement, drug interactions. sherman and her sister were the only regular u.s. armed forces. >> in may of 1986, sherman was delivered to the shipiard for renovatio renovatio shipyard for renovations. [inaudible] >> after completing the trial period of this project, sheave recommissioned as part of new generation fully operational marine vessels as the coast guard celebrated 200 years of service. in july 2001. sherman assisted with the u.s. sanctions in the persian gulf and supported good will in south africa and madagascar and received a medal for the interdiction of a panamanian vessel carrying 20 tons of corn where a street value of $600 million. in may of 2011. sherman was transferred to her current home in san dieg
humanitarian exchange. it's been a wonderful way for us to work together on some of these common issues and figure out how our agencies are all going to integrate. i think the time and effort that has been expended by both the military planners and also the civilian planners is definitely going to be bearing fruit in years to come when something happens. i know we are quite a bit ahead of time, you are going to have a 20-minute break from now and then our next speaker will come up at that point. thank you again. he heads the baur row of medicine for the navy. i lacked at his bay oh in the program, educated in georgia and he's had a great career in the navy commanding several hospitals, winning several awards and his most recent command was as the commander of walter reed, and i was so glad that he was here to hear the panel that we had with our medical peer to peer exercise. and he's going to talk to us now about navy medicine. with that, please help me welcome vice admiral matthew nathan. (applause). >> thank you, general, very much. well, it's a pleasure here and i'm honored to b
how that would apply if we're using those folks in a humanitarian disaster in california. we're able to treat our folks regardless of the state of licensing in a particular state, though. >> last year when i took a look at the shock trauma platoon, and i'm going to talk to you about that one really cool thing i saw. i have a little bit of medical experience and to see they have effectively a robotic soldier that can go into defib, whose eyes can dilate, they can do pulses both radial and distal and there is a programmer who is effectively testing a battlefield soldier what to do, i found absolutely fascinating as a way to bring a real life experience to that individual. for me that was a fantastic tool that you have and i thought that was wonderful. >> we're going to be -- little advertisement -- we're going to be demonstrating that capability at our display at the marina green so if you'd like to come see that, that's available. >> any final questions? i'd like to thank our panelists very much. as rob mentioned earlier, the exercise series we have put on and started 3 years ago h
with the maritime services and the coast guard and our reserve forces, i like to think of us as america's or the world's 911 when something bad, either man-made or natural happens, some catastrophe happens in the world, often times the ambassador will pick up the phone and dial 911 and the navy marine corps team answers the phone. it is our those, it is our dna it is our ability to be there. if you look at the communicate dapbt's 3 central tenets of what he believes it importance, readiness is in there. the ability to move and go now. where do you want us, when do you want us, like fedex, we are absolutely guaranteed to be there overnight. it's what we do. it's what we are trained for. and the more we understand and can operate with civic forces, the more we understand what already exists in our life line, the more we can break down political barriers and culture barriers that exist within our own country, the more we can partner and stabilize and support civic operations, because as someone said earlier in the panel, if we need to come in, things are pretty bad. but here's the go
places, you know, have told us why. and these enhancements will address those concerns that we have heard from conventioneers that haven't been able to stay here or want to come here and can't because of the size of our existing facility. it's my understanding due to the load-in and load-out, we can't have two conventions running at the same time. and this would allow us to have up to three conventions at one time, or a larger one and so there wouldn't be as much downtime in terms, because there would be more space. >> it would be good to know how we compare with our competitors after all of this money, hopefully, we have the upper hand. >> yes. i can get you that information. i just don't have it today. absolutely, it would make us much more competitive. >> thanks. >> commissioner white? >> yes. with the expansion, do we have the capacity as far as hotel and our infrastructure in regards to the guests in town to get around and do all the things that they need to do? >> yes. >> we do? >> yes? >> yes. >> right now we have vacancies in our hotels. so this would address some of t
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)